A Photographer’s 10 Year Transition From DSLR to iPhone X and 8 Plus

Panorama Shot on the iPhone 5 in 2012
Panorama Shot on the iPhone 5 in 2012

With the pending announcement and release of the iPhone 8, or the iPhone Pro, iPhone X or whatever the new flagship iPhone is going to be called, the photography industry as a whole is once again going to be forced to advance to places it perhaps never considered 10 years ago. Features like dual sensors with different focal length lenses, the possibility of something like “scene selection,” and even the good “old” things like geo-tagging images (why is this still not a standard on all DSLR’s at this point?) will continue to provide space in the market between Apple and the big camera makers. This is probably never more true for Nikon and Canon who, over the last 10 years, have started to look slightly “Nokia-like” in advancements beyond the DSLR. They haven’t completely stuck their proverbial head in the sand, I think they woke up just in time, but it was just far too late for me.

Both companies have started branching out into mirrorless cameras, but it feels like they’re just playing catch up with Sony and Fujifilm, not transformational as in the past decades. Sony and Fujifilm at this point feel like the cutting edge of cameras just beyond the DSLR market, perhaps a bridge between mirrorless and the smartphone. Yes you will be able to shoot DSLR at native ISO-64 (and in probably complete darkness before long), and many other incrimental advancements, but they feel almost forced, and very late.

Of course Nikon and Canon built their empires on the SLR and then the DSLR, so changing business models 10 years ago probably wasn’t even on the horizon. The never ending product cycle of updated models was huge back when digital photography made giant leaps each year rendering previous models ancient worthless dinosaurs. My Nikon D100 I paid $2,000 for back in 2002 is worthless today, and that’s good for Nikon, except I’m no longer buying new models, and that can’t be good for them. I know there are more people like me who have come to the realization that, yes the sensor on the iPhone isn’t a DSLR, it’s never going to capture the same IQ as a full-frame or APS-C sensor, but now, and with the iPhone 8, it’s finally good enough.

I get it. It would have been hard, if not impossible, for them to abandon their cash cow. I just can’t help but think about how those meetings went when they finally decided to divert sizable cash reserves to R&D for some unknown non-DSLR future. Other industries can vouch for similar fates. How about the music industry, newspapers, magazines, point-n-shoot cameras, or when was the last time you bought a flashlight or a calculator, or how about an alarm clock?

From a “serious” photographer’s perspective I know what you are thinking, you just can’t compare a digital full frame sensor, or even an APS-C sized sensor, with the microscopic sensor of an iPhone. And you are correct. I’m not. I’m comparing my own walk through years of equipment purchases with the fact that I have now come to the point now where I no longer consider the big bulky expensive DSLR to be a required tool for the serious photographer, or at least for this photographer, who is serious about his work.

And while the iPhone may never kill off the DSLR, it has decimated the point-n-shoot market, and continues to make big strides in little packages. Just peruse Flickr and look at the trends of uploads. Perhaps Flickr isn’t the best example but I always enjoy flipping through the “top” camera images to see the trends in camera usage. Yes, maybe 500px is a better place to look for the more serious photographer, but their stats aren’t quite up to date for an equal comparison, and any way you look statistically at the argument right now it’s flawed, but consumer equipment on mobile devices is staggering.

Top 5 Cameras for Users on Flickr
Top 5 Cameras for Users on Flickr

Nikon and Canon aside, companies are continuing to think outside the box when it comes to capturing light, and that’s a great thing for consumers. Advancements like Light.co who just released their handheld 52mp 10 sensor point-n-shoot to Apple, maybe Samsung, even Fujifilm to some extent, have changed photography from the few who can (try to) afford big glass and new DSLR’s over and over again, to being completely and totally ubiquitous. In the past 10 years, this change has completely rearranged my thinking about the tools I carry as a photographer.

I’ve been shooting since 1984, and shooting seriously since about 1996 when I started studying photography in college. I made the transition from instant film in the 80’s to 35mm film in the 90’s to digital in 2000 (with a rinky-dink 1mp digital HP point-n-shoot. I was just so excited to be shooting digital I got the first digital camera I could find and afford).

Without getting too much into the technical aspect of image sensors and how many pixels get packed into something on the order of the 1/3.6in (or 3.99mm x 7.21) size sensor of my iPhone 7 Plus, it’s obviously a much smaller sensor than a 35mm full frame sensor. For me, it’s finally come to the point where it doesn’t have to. The results you can get with the iPhone today are well worthy to be called another photographic tool in the camera bag of a serious photographer. The colors have rich tones with little noise. The dynamic range improves all the time, and the editing tools have even moved to more advanced modes including RAW.

Atlanta Airport at the Gate in the Rain Shot on an iPhone 7 Plus
Atlanta Airport at the Gate in the Rain Shot on an iPhone 7 Plus
Foggy Sunrise Shot on the iPhone 7 Plus
Foggy Sunrise Shot on the iPhone 7 Plus
Jordan-Hare Stadium November 28 2015, Shot on the iPhone 6
Jordan-Hare Stadium November 28 2015, Shot on the iPhone 6

My iPhone 7 Plus works for 85% of everything I want to shoot on a daily basis, and since the iPhone 5, that percentage seems to be going up every time a new version comes out. Of course no, I’m not shooting weddings anymore, or senior portraits, or super long exposure astrological events. You can only push the iPhone sensor so far, but those times when I truly miss my DSLR have become fewer and fewer each year.

This year I took the leap to give up my biggest pro mirrorless body in anticipation of the iPhone 8, and I’m ok with that. With the release of the iPhone 8 / Pro and a sensor that can perhaps shoot 4k video along with 1080p in 240fps, with two lenses, wide and mid-focal length, AND take great images, I just can’t justify carrying around anything else in my camera bag (i.e. pocket) on an hourly/daily basis. The best phrase I’ve heard over the years is “the best camera is the one you have with you,” and that is never more true than one that can fit in your pocket.

Shooting at Las Vegas Airport with my Nikon D100 and Nikkor 80–200mm f/2.8 lens in 2002.
Shooting at Las Vegas Airport with my Nikon D100 and Nikkor 80–200mm f/2.8 lens in 2002.

I started shooting with the first consumer DSLR that Nikon released in 2002, the Nikon D100, and from that time forward I became a pixel counter with the masses. I think must have used every lens and every DSLR that Nikon made between 2002–2015 (minus the D5). That camera, along with the Nikkor 80–200mm f/2.8 was a great, but a super expensive, combination for what I was shooting at the time, aviation photography. My long haul camera combination in that time period was the D7000/D7200 and the Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 lens. That came to be my most used and loved combination that went all over the United States, Uganda, and Europe. I shot well over 100,000 images with that combination, and I loved it. But now, times are different, and where the Nikon D100 cost $2,000 at the time of launch, the iPhone 8/Pro will be half the price, weigh basically nothing, fit in a 6-inch form factor, and is miles ahead in it’s light capturing abilities.

Camera System Relevance vs Time Against DSLR and iPhone Cameras
Camera System Relevance vs Time Against DSLR and iPhone Cameras

I’ve owned every iPhone model released (basically for the camera), except the 5S, and over the last 10 years I’ve also gone through this DSLR “gear acquisition syndrome” (G.A.S.) that all photographers go through. It’s always been the DSLR is king, and the cellphone is garbage. Now, over a period of just 10 years those two positions have changed dramatically, and with the release of the iPhone 8, to me, the DSLR has been de-thowned for every day use. If you look at the (very unscientific chart above) they have, in my photo bag world, had two opposite corresponding curves. At least for me, the iPhone 8 Pro will solidify that, even before I see the specs on the camera.

Sunset in the Winter Shot on the iPhone 5 on January 27, 2012
Sunset in the Winter Shot on the iPhone 5 on January 27, 2012

The big shift in my mind was when the iPhone 5 came out. The image at the top of this article, a panorama of Jordan-Hare Stadium, has for years now been the best selling image I have ever taken. And it was taken with an iPhone, almost 5 years ago! When the iPhone 6 came out I sold my Nikon gear and moved to the Fujifilm mirrorless X-Pro2 and X70, (a fantastic system), and this year, I’m moving to the iPhone 8/Pro and completely out of the heavy, bulky, expensive cameras.

The inside the main sanctuary of Independent Presbyterian Church in Birmingham AL shot on the iPhone 5 in 2012.
The inside the main sanctuary of Independent Presbyterian Church in Birmingham AL shot on the iPhone 5 in 2012.

The term iPhonography has been around a while. I started intentionally shooting with the iPhone camera since the first one was released, and this is just a sliver of what I’ve been able to achieve over the years with that tiny little sensor. That doesn’t even take in account my Instagram, which I loved way back before Facebook even knew it was a thing. Almost every image on that site was shot on some version of the iPhone. And if you want to see some truly amazing work done on the iPhone visit IPPAWARDS and browse their winnersthat span over the 10 year lifetime of the iPhone camera.

The problem with camparing a DSLR to a smartphone though is flawed at best because you aren’t comparing apples to apples so to speak. A better comparison or statement might be what are you giving up? What are the tradeoffs you are willing to make when going from a DSLR to a smartphone?

So I’m less about making a direct comparison of DSLR vs iPhone than I am confirming that, if you are passionate about photography, forget about the gear. Read, study, shoot with whatever you have, and improve every day. Learn why depth of field is important and how to use it. Learn about stops of light, exposure, shutter speeds, and shoot as much as you can possibly shoot. In the mean time, here is some iPhonography favorites of mine so far this year.

Waiting at the Gate in Atlanta at Sunrise, Shot on iPhone 7 Plus
Waiting at the Gate in Atlanta at Sunrise, Shot on iPhone 7 Plus
MacBook Pro and Fujifilm X70
MacBook Pro and Fujifilm X70
Jet Flyby in Auburn Shot on iPhone 7 Plus
Jet Flyby in Auburn Shot on iPhone 7 Plus
Selfie with Raindrops on the Hood of My Truck
Selfie with Raindrops on the Hood of My Truck
Auburn University Iconic Samford Hall
Auburn University Iconic Samford Hall
Super Foggy Morning in the Pasture
Super Foggy Morning in the Pasture
Black and White Reflections of the Clouds in Atlanta, Shot on iPhone 6S
Black and White Reflections of the Clouds in Atlanta, Shot on iPhone 6S
Halftime Fireworks at Jordan-Hare Stadium, iPhone 7 Plus
Halftime Fireworks at Jordan-Hare Stadium, iPhone 7 Plus
Black and White Sunrise, iPhone 5
Black and White Sunrise, iPhone 5

The images above were all shot on an iPhone, most on the iPhone 7 Plus unless undicated, and edited with the Apple camera app. I rarely use anything other than the Apple Camera app, but on occasion I will use Snapseed, Lightroom Mobile, and once in a while Camera+. Photography on the iPhone is less about the edit because for the most part you are not shooting RAW and editing is limited to a JPG, it’s more about good technique and getting back to the basics of photography. Light, composition, exposure, subject; that’s what I try to concentrate on those over what filter some app provides.

I can’t wait to start shooting with the new camera in a short while. What are your hopes for the iPhone 8 this year?

iOS Panorama Beauty of Auburn's Jordan-Hare Stadium

Auburn Jordan-Hare Stadium Panorama
Auburn Jordan-Hare Stadium Panorama

There is nothing quite like a stadium full of 87,451 fans creating a sea of orange and blue. It actually doesn’t happen all that often, and it’s even harder to capture all 87,000 people in one single photo. My expectations for the rest of the season are very low at this point, but that’s ok, Auburn is still Auburn, and while there are many reasons why I love this town, football is one. Ever since the iPhone 5 came out this shot above is the very shot I had in my mind for the new panorama feature, and I finally got to take it during the Auburn vs Arkansas game. The result is something that can only be seen with a very wide angle lens, or in a stitched panorama shot of the stadium, from the south end zone. I loaded a full size high-res version here if you want to take a look at the shot at full size.

It does take a little practice to get a decent panorama shot using the new iOS 6 camera feature, but with some practice you can really get some great shots that you can’t get without a lot of work and specialized skills otherwise. My first real professional attempt was done at this scenic vista in Colorado called Lake City back in 2008. That setup required an elaborate (but well worth it) set of tripods, panorama ball heads by Markins (an outstanding ball head), levels, and some good knowledge of Photoshop to be able to stitch together the final panorama product. Today, a mere 4 years later, it’s a much different landscape with the iOS 6 option where the software allows you to take the shot above, automatically stitching together a series of shots taken simultaneously.

If you have your own iOS 6 panorama example leave it in the comments below. I’m going to offer a how-to on the iOS option down the road, but for now, stadiums make a great subject.

On Apple's Tribute to Steve Jobs One Year Later

Pulling into the Gate in Amsterdam Airport
Pulling into the Gate in Amsterdam Airport

I remember landing in Amsterdam on October 5, 2011 after being in the air for almost 10 hours. I turned on my iPhone and AP news alerts started pinging my phone as happens when a “world event” takes place. I read through the Fox News, CNN, Sky News alerts and articles, and read through my Twitter and Facebook feeds. As we pulled up to the gate I had already received the text below from Deborah (yes I have all my text messages from years ago), a message received in my hand sitting on a runway in the Netherlands thousands of miles away from Auburn, Alabama.

Text Message From DeborahAs we pulled up to the gate I took the photo above of the Delta flight parked next to our gate, pulled it into my Camera+ app, put a boarder around it and posted it to Instagram. At this point I had already checked my email, responded to a few emails, and looked up our connecting flight information. All from a small piece of metal, glass, and plastic that didn’t exist a few years earlier.

This may sounds like a lot of poetic musings for a phone, but for some reason my mind wasn’t ready for this particular piece of news that morning, and it confused me. I was on my way to Africa, and the only reason I was going to have any personal connection with my wife halfway around the world was because Steve Jobs had decided he was going to invent and create what I was holding in my hand.

Here was a man who shared no convictions with my faith, a brilliant man who had no understanding beyond the pluralistic view of Christianity known for centuries mixed with his version of Buddhism. He just couldn’t go beyond his own understanding and even made this statement to Isaacson:

“The juice goes out of Christianity when it becomes too based on faith rather than on living like Jesus or seeing the world as Jesus saw it,” he told me. “I think different religions are different doors to the same house. Sometimes I think the house exists, and sometimes I don’t.”

Yet I still felt some connection, even if a minor one, with Jobs, sitting on a runway in Europe, as if the plane full of people melted away leaving me and my connection with Jobs sitting in my hand. He shared none of my beliefs, yet he changed the world, my world, and still does on a daily basis. After I got home from Africa I read, back to back, the biography on Steve Jobs and the biography on Dietrich Bonhoeffer by Metaxas. What an amazing contrast of times and cultures, beliefs, and both had the ability to change the world. Ultimately in death, as we all will do some day, either looking to what lies ahead, one perhaps clinging to life here on earth, so did these two great men.

I boarded the plane to Africa, still thinking about Jobs’ fate and wrote this as we took off.

The biggest surprise to me so far [on this trip], was upon landing, finding out that Steve Jobs died. I was truly saddened to hear this. I know we are all temporary to this world, but this man, who for all accounts wasn’t a believer, changed the world. He forever changed the way the world communicates, how we are connected with each other, and the reason I can talk to Deborah from this plane in Europe while she is in Auburn.

He affected so many people through his innovations. How are we to greave his death? I’m saddened over his death as if he was someone I knew personally, and at the same time I really don’t know why either. Death seems so imminent for all of us, especially when you hear about Jobs dying at 59. I know why we die, the fall created this and Christ had to die for us, but it’s still so hard to understand. I didn’t even know Jobs, but I will miss him. The new iPhone announcement yesterday had people wanting to see Jobs at the event, people who never knew, other than God, that he would die the very next day. I pray for his soul.

I’m not even really sure why I write this today other than to acknowledge the gravity this one person had on our world. A person I vastly disagree with on almost all aspects of life, yet he was someone who had a positive impact on so many people.

Jobs once said “simplicity is the ultimate sophistication,” which really became his whole life philosophy, and was carried on today by Tim Cook and Apple with the video on their front page and the letter below. What other for-profit company would take down their entire front page just to show a 2 minute tribute video. Simplicity and sophistication.

Apple's Tribute to Steve Jobs
Apple’s Tribute to Steve Jobs

Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside, a MacBook 5,1

Project 365 [Day 239] Inside Look at the Mother Board of a MacBook 5,1
Project 365 [Day 239] Inside Look at the Mother Board of a MacBook 5,1
This post serves a few different purposes, like Day 239 of my Project 365, but once in a while I like to get something up there for the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge, and since this week’s theme was inside, I thought this would make a great shot. I don’t spend all of my days inside one of these, but at least some part of each week is spent messing around on the inside of one of these machines. This one is the first generation aluminum MacBook 5,1 (before the MBP version). This is the entire mother board here, RAM at the top and most of the guts on the flip side of the circuit board. The MacBook5,1 as it is known was one of the first unibody frames, and made a great laptop for several years, and in the very center of this mother board you can see the words “Apple ©2008.” Things move fast in the world of laptops and tablets, and this machine is now almost a relic of its day, now designated as a “streaming machine” for videos.

I was trying to think back at how many laptops and desktop computers I have had over the past 20 years (including an actual IBM 5150 from the 1980’s), but there is just no way in the world to know. My first computers weren’t Gateway or Dell, but were hand built IBM machines where I picked out each RAM chip, video card, modem, the CPU chip and so on, each separately. Wow those were the days

You can get a lot of life out of old machines for secondary purposes, and sites like iFixit with their step by step teardown of almost every single Mac ever made is a great place for do easy repairs, even iFixit on this old MacBook5,1. More and more these once great laptops are being replaced by better and better tablets, like the iPad, and Nexus 7, I already wonder how we ever lugged around such a massive device.

Sophistication Through Simplicity

MacBook Air Desktop

I didn’t just post a picture of a black square, this is actually my desktop. I love the clean, simple, and yet still very sophisticated… desktop, home screen, written code, verse, prose, lyric, file structure, office, room, company, house, life… etc (could be I like this so much because life in reality is actually very messy). This term, sophistication through simplicity, has come across my desk several times over the last few weeks, and it’s a phrase I have attempted to develop throughout every aspect of my life for years now. The main reason of course is that this really seems to be how Jesus lived out his earthly ministry. Scripture is so complex, packed full of highly technical arguments and situations, yet, the stories of Jesus’ life are simple enough for any child to understand. The verse on my various desktops in the graphic above about Jesus in John 1.14 is one of the most complex and sophisticated statements ever uttered, yet it’s so very simple.

There are so many ways I try to live this out, and one is being very aggressive at keeping my digital life organized, my desk clean, and to only allow those things which are most important to be most visible. That’s one reason why I really love using an Apple product over a Windows PC or an Android device (I have all the above and use all of them for different things, so I’m not totally Apple bias). Apple just makes it so easy to be digitally organized and in our modern day is a secular company that has spent 30 years perfecting sophistication through simplicity, something Steve Jobs took to its extreme. There are many different ways to achieve this, but a disorganized digital life (to me) is no different than a messy living room, or a house full of junk I don’t need.

I can’t think of a time in my life when I have ever been this busy, a time (or season if you will) when I am being pulled in so many different directions all at once. None of those directions are necessarily “bad” so to speak, but I find the busier I get, the more I have to simplify, organize, and focus on specifics. And that’s why I love the concept of sophistication through simplicity. It allows you to stay focused, remove distractions, and focus on what’s important.

Google Drive vs Dropbox, Amazon, or Microsoft Sky Drive for Cloud Storage?

Google Drive Storage

There was some great news from Google this week concerning cloud storage, and while it isn’t up to what I want in replacing your hard drive, Google Drive is a great step forward in drive cloud storage with 5GB free, and apparently I’m grandfathered in to my 20GB $5/year plan (see screenshot below). Finally Google put some effort into developing something we can truly use instead of trying to beat Facebook or Twitter at social networking. Eventually, this type of storage is going to do away with our need to keep purchasing more and more hard drives to store our files with only a small flash drive needed on the system for the OS. I have almost 8TB’s of data stored on local hard drives at this point, so this lousy 5GB of storage won’t help that, but it’s a start.

If you aren’t familiar with using cloud storage, until now, there was really only one real option, and that was Dropbox. Yes there are those like Box.com and Amazon Cloud Drive (provide 5 GB), and Microsoft’s SkyDrive (offers 25 GB) who just made some nice improvements this week, probably in anticipation of the release of Google Drive. Each of those have some significant disadvantages, and I don’t ever really consider them to be viable options because of their limitations or issues. Apple’s iCloud is great for backing up devices, but it doesn’t even offer an option for drive storage in the cloud. While I love Dropbox, the basic computer user still isn’t really familiar with Dropbox, and they are with Google. That doesn’t make Google better than Dropbox, but it does make Google Drive easier to integrate with your friends or family to share files. So which one is better, Google Drive or Dropbox? There services seem to be almost identical, but Google has some significant advantages over Dropbox.

Google Drive Storage 20GB $5 year

The biggest news, at least to me, about the Google Drive launch in the fact that they are going to allow you to keep up to 100GB of data stored for a reasonable price of $5.99, it’s just too bad once you get above that, it’s outrageous, but that too will change. This is great on multiple levels, and something probably only Google could do with some massive data centers that companies like Dropbox, and perhaps even Microsoft, just don’t have. When you are looking at possible server farm potential for cloud storage, the biggest possibilities right now are Google, Amazon, and of course Apple who just built a massive cloud server farm in North Carolina, which is even visible from space now. All of this is good for those who want all files stored in the cloud instead of on local home hard drives that fail.

Advantages and Disadvantages in Google Drive vs Dropbox

  • More storage – 5GB of Storage on Google compared to 2GB on Dropbox (you can gain more on Dropbox)
  • Blanket Existing Coverage  – most of us already use Google for just about everything from email to Internet searches
  • Google Recognition – sometimes this is negative, but in this case, everyone has heard of Google, tech-nerds know Dropbox
  • Integration and Development in OS – both have ability to run within MAC OS-X or Windows but Google has greater development potential. The biggest plus here is with Google Docs and other Google products.
  • Automatic Syncing – both have this as well, that’s the point of cloud storage
  • Works with iOS and Android – both have this too (Google Drive says coming soon on iOS), but the Dropbox versions could use some better features, hopefully Google will do this
  • Backup – this is a big question for me, what happens with my account and my files if the company goes Chapter 11. Google has less chance to do this.
  • Potential Increases in Storage – Google is known for increasing storage size constantly, and to me, the more storage the better
  • Integration with Google Apps – Not sure how soon this is on their radar, but at work we use a Google App account
  • No URL Links – Dropbox just released this feature this week, a feature that lets you have a unique URL for each file. I see no mention about this in the Google Drive information but it has to be in the works, they couldn’t have just overlooked this feature. For now, I only see this available on Dropbox.

For now we all have to wait until Google actually rolls it out instead of just giving us the information, and of course, they developed the Android OS before the iOS, so us Apple iPhone and iPad users will have to wait even longer. Still, it’s a step in the right cloud storage direction!

Project 365 [Day 145] Photo Editing Day for Project 365

Project 365 [Day 145] Editing Day for Project 365 on My 27" iMac

Today was editing day for Project 365. I am truly amazed at how difficult it has been to keep up with this seemingly simple task of taking one image a day for 365 days. I have managed to keep up ok with actually taking the image, although some days it has come right down to the wire, but trying to keep up with posting said images has been a difficult task. I could have made it a little easier on myself and just posted raw unprocessed iPhone images on Instagr.am every day, but that just isn’t my style. So this photo above is, yes, a photo of my office where I am processing my photos, but that’s what I did today. To see the other P365 (or posts) images just go to the gallery at http://p365.me  over on my Flickr site where they are arranged day by day.

Please Welcome My Nephew to the World of Photo Blogging

Jacob Marchio Working on His Blog

I’m so excited to see my nephew, Jacob, starting his first blog, so everyone please jump over to his newly created blog at www.JacobMarchio.com and add it to your reader or leave him a nice comment on his first post. After saving up and getting his first Digital SLR camera, a Nikon D3100 (see the post here where we went to pick up his camera), he quickly realized that he wanted a place to post his photos other than his Flickr account page where it is sometimes hard to write in a whole lot of detail.

At this point I have helped a lot of people setup a new blog, but I am not sure I have ever had someone this excited about getting started. His blog will generally be posts about his photography and his interest in astronomy, and for his age, he is quite a talented photographer and astronomer. I am really looking forward to seeing how his blog develops over time, I hope you will check it out from time to time as well and give him some nice encouragement along the way.

Spring Rains Across the South Today :: Friday Feet

Friday Feet Photo of the Day

Today was one of those rainy days that every time I tried to get out and get something done, it poured. I ended up cutting a few acres of grass, getting soaked in the process, then trying to finish my current book (How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth), but such is the way the weather goes in the Spring in the south. That’s better than not getting any rain at all, which has been the case over the past several years with our drought. Today my iPad and a rainy screened in patio will serve for a long overdue Friday Feet Photo of the Day.

Reflections on the Grey Days of Fall in the South :: Friday Feet

We can’t seem to escape from these cloudy grey days down here, but it could be far worse, we could be somewhere farther north where it’s got to be colder. My Friday Feet today came from an impromptu photowalk around my the block, so to speak. I was taking a very needed break from writing one of three research papers that are due by next Friday.

One of the subjects of photography I have always loved to look for are reflections. Reflections are one of the more rarely photographed views basically because you have to search them out, and then try to make the subject useable. Reflections are everywhere, and they look great when they show up naturally. We have a small pond in the back of our place that has very little water in it right now, and consequently, it’s very black and still.

As I walked around the property I found a great combination, and created the shot below of me with my iPhone. There isn’t any special filters or photoshopping done to the image below, just a little boost to the contrast to bring out the leaves (see exif metadata here). The reflection of myself comes from the water, just like the trees above my head. The color and texture comes from the leaves sitting on the mud bottom of the pond, so the shot is both translucent, and reflective. The shot just below of me holding my iPhone out over the pond is my P365.me :2012 (Project 365) image today for Day 11. All shots in this post were taken on my iPhone. Have a great weekend everyone.